Wasabi: Is the Wasabi You’re Eating the Real Deal?

Wasabi: Is the Wasabi You’re Eating the Real Deal?

Dr. Mercola

Wasabi (Wasabia japonica) is a member of the Brassicaceae family, commonly called the mustard family. It is native to Japan, where it thrives in cool mountain streams with lots of shade and running water.

It is prized for its stem which grows to around 2 to 4 inches in diameter and 6 to 12 inches in length, because this is where the actual wasabi condiment comes from.1 Due to its very specific growing conditions, experts consider wasabi to be one of the hardest plants on the planet to cultivate.2

The history of wasabi goes back to ancient Japan, as far as 1,300 years ago, when a wooden board was discovered to have a writing that mentions wasabi. Interestingly, Japan’s oldest law code (Taiho ritsuryo) indicates that one of the items that Japanese citizens could render as tax was their harvest of wasabi.3

You may have tasted wasabi before and are familiar with its spicy flavor, and very strong aroma that you won’t find anywhere else. But chances are that the wasabi you’ve eaten is just an imitation composed of horseradish, mustard powder and food coloring.4

Real wasabi, on the other hand, is still hot and doesn’t leave a burning aftertaste. It’s so fresh that you’ll need to serve it right before eating, because it will lose its iconic flavor within 15 minutes.5 You’ll also be surprised to know that real wasabi contains plenty of nutrients essential for optimal health, such as:6

Fiber Protein
Calcium Iron
Magnesium Phosphorus
Potassium Sodium
Zinc Vitamin C
Thiamin Riboflavin
Niacin Folate
Vitamin A Vitamin B6

Even If It’s Just a Condiment, Wasabi Offers Strong Health Benefits

Wasabi is abundant in a unique antioxidant called isothiocyanates that provides a wide array of health benefits, which also happen to be the reason for wasabi’s unique flavor and aroma. Below are the different health benefits that authentic wasabi can provide you:7

May Help Prevent Cancer

Adding wasabi to your diet may help lower your risk for certain types of cancer thanks to its isothiocyanates. In one study, the 6-MITC [6-(methylsulfinyl)hexyl isothiocyanate] and I7557 [6-methylsulfonyl)hexyl isothiocyanate] compounds in wasabi have been shown to inhibit the growth of pancreatic cancer cells.8

In another study, 6-MITC has been shown to suppress the growth of not only breast cancer, but skin cancer as well.9 Research on this powerful plant is still ongoing, but these findings show great promise already. Remember if you want to reap the benefits of these anticancer antioxidants, use authentic wasabi only, not commercially produced varieties.

Helps Improve Cardiovascular Health

Wasabi’s isothiocyanates may help prevent platelet aggregation.10 Essentially, platelet aggregation is the clumping together of red blood cells, which can eventually lead to blood clots. These clots are the main sources of stroke and other cardiovascular diseases. By adding wasabi to your diet, you may be able to lower your risk of developing these life-threatening conditions.

Helps Fight Inflammation

The same anti-platelet aggregation properties of wasabi may aid with inflammation by helping decrease the symptoms of arthritis. Wasabi works by blocking prostaglandin, which is a neurotransmitter responsible for inflammation and pain. The isothiocyanates may help prevent other inflammation-related diseases as well, like asthma and inflammatory bowel disease.

Fights Bacteria Throughout Your Body

Wasabi may be a potent antibacterial agent. In a study published in the International Journal of Food Microbiology, wasabi has been found to be effective against Helicobacter pylori. The roots were found to be the strongest, but the other parts of the plant have been found to help kill the bacteria as well.11

In another study published in the journal Bioscience, Biotechnology and Biochemistry, the stem of the wasabi plant was found to have strong antibacterial properties against E. coli and Staphylococcus aureus. For the methodology, an extract was taken from the roots and placed on the bacteria, which the researchers studied and recorded.12

Helps Improve Digestive Health

Wasabi contains fiber, which is known to help control your blood sugar by slowing your stomach’s digestion of carbohydrates. Fiber may help you maintain your weight too, as it makes you feel full longer, thereby reducing your craving for snacks. It’s also good for your intestine, as it may reduce your risk of diverticulitis, an inflammation of polyps in your intestine, by as much as 40 percent.13

It’s Possible to Grow Wasabi in Your Own Home — But It Can Be Challenging

According to Real Wasabi, an American company that specializes in mountain-grown wasabi, certain conditions are required to grow high-quality wasabi:14

“Wasabi prefers cool, shady conditions and will sometimes thrive if left undisturbed in misty mountain stream beds. It generally requires a climate with an air temperature between 8 degrees Celsius (46 degrees Fahrenheit) and 20 degrees Celsius (70 degrees Fahrenheit), and prefers high humidity in summer.

Since it is quite intolerant of direct sunlight, wasabi is typically grown under shade cloth or beneath a natural forest canopy.”

Due to the very specific environment needed to grow wasabi, the U.S. has very few locations that can grow wasabi naturally. Only the Pacific Northwest states have been able to successfully cultivate it, namely Oregon, Idaho and Washington, due to their abundance in naturally flowing mountain streams.15

The mountainous regions of North Carolina have been proven to be effective as well.16 Wasabi grows very slowly, and can take up to three years to fully mature. In the right conditions, the long stems (petioles) of the plant should emerge from the (rhizomes) stem, growing around 12 to 18 inches long.

Once the plant reaches up to 2 feet in height and width, it enters the next phase where the rhizome produces the nutrients and flavor it is renowned for.

It is possible to grow wasabi on your own if you live near a mountain stream with lots of shade, but keep in mind that the plant could be susceptible to disease and other outside factors that you won’t be able to control.17 You can try growing wasabi in the comfort of your own backyard by using the seedling box method.

Here are some useful pointers from a Pacific Northwest Extension publication entitled “Growing Wasabi in the Pacific Northwest,” by Carol Miles and Catherine Chadwick:18

“The seedling box method utilizes planting boxes that are approximately 4 inches deep with bottom drainage holes. A 1.5-inch layer of a well-draining germination or rooting medium such as a vermiculite perlite-peat mix will work as a base. Wasabi seeds should be sown approximately 2 inches apart in the planting box and covered with 0.5 inches of the germination mix (Suzuki, 1968).

An unheated greenhouse is the best place to keep the boxes, which must be watered so the seeds stay moist. However, it is important not to saturate the potting mix. The seeds should germinate in 20 days.”

Wasabi plants are prone to sunburn, so protect them by using a black shade cloth. If you can invest in a small misting or micro-irrigation system, that will help keep the soil moist consistently and make your life easier. The plants require running water, and a micro-immigration system mimics Mother Nature’s running streams. Plant the seeds from September through October so they will germinate before winter begins.19

Selecting the Best Wasabi and Properly Storing It

If circumstances don’t permit you to grow your own wasabi, you can purchase from companies that specialize in cultivating certified organic and mountain-grown wasabi.

When selecting wasabi, choose the ones that have fresh, unshriveled roots. When looking at wasabi leaves, use the same principle as you would in purchasing salad greens — they must not be soggy and have a uniform color.20 To store wasabi properly, wrap the roots in damp towels and refrigerate them when not in use. To maintain the freshness, rinse them in cold water every other day and remove any spoiled roots. If done correctly, your wasabi can last up to 30 days.21

Foods You Can Try Wasabi With, Aside From Sushi

For maximum flavor and freshness, wasabi is best prepared right before you serve your meals. To do this, peel the root with a knife first, then grate it using circular motions with a metal grater. By grating the wasabi, you’re causing the compounds in the plant to become volatile, thus resulting in the iconic wasabi zing.22 Aside from using it for sushi, you can use grated wasabi in the following foods:23

  • Add to noodle soups
  • A condiment for grilled meats and vegetables
  • Add to marinades, dips and salad dressings
  • Toss with roasted vegetables

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